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ALTH 1400Introduction to Allied Health

This course prepares students for rapidly changing healthcare careers. This course includes basic knowledge healthcare workers utilize contributing to the safe and effective delivery of healthcare. Course content focuses on: behaviors for success in healthcare, communications in the healthcare setting, awareness and sensitivity to patient needs, legal issues in healthcare, ethical issues in healthcare, respecting patient and staff diversity and healthcare safety and Standard Precautions.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): None
Faculty Liaison(s): Marilyn Slattengren
Credits: 2

ALTH 1410Medical Terminology

This course focuses on the component parts of medical terms: prefixes, suffixes and word roots. Students practice formation, analysis and reconstruction of terms with an emphasis on spelling, definition and pronunciation.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Marilyn Slattengren
Credits: 1

ART 1118 – Art Appreciation

An introduction to human creativity and expression in the visual arts from a global perspective. Students will view and discuss works from a wide spectrum of human history and world cultures with an emphasis on expression, style, and artistic meaning.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities and Fine Arts, and (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Cody Olander
Credits: 3

ART 1138Ceramics I

Working with ceramic techniques emphasizing slab, pinch, coil, and wheel methods of clay construction.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities and Fine Arts
Course Pre-Requisite(s): None
Faculty Liaison(s): Cody Olander
Credits: 3

BIOL 1005Introduction to Cell Biology

An introduction to the field of cell biology with a focus on the basic unit of life, the cell – its function, chemistry, metabolism, and structure.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Brian Bich
Credits: 1

BIOL 1009Forensic Biology

Hands-on instruction in chemical and biological forensic lab techniques which are also used in environmental, medical, and molecular biology. Primarily a lab-based course designed to teach introductory cell and molecular biology employing the scientific method to solve cases. Labs, assignments, readings, and instructions will be chosen from the following topics: lab safety, microscope use (hair and fiber analysis), DNA extraction, fingerprinting and replication, chemistry of life, protein separation and analysis (electrophoresis, Western blot), bacterial culture and transformation, chromatography, genetically-modified organisms (GMO), cell replication forensic etymology.

MTC goal areas: (3) Natural Sciences
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Terrence Wilcox
Credits: 3

BIOL 1120General Biology I

An introduction to the field of biology focusing on unifying biological principles, concepts, and theories. Includes the scientific method; life’s chemical basis; cell theory; cellular structure, function, metabolism, and reproduction; genetics and inheritance; evolution, and an introduction to community and ecosystem ecology. Lab includes conducting, interpreting, and communicating results of lab exercises and experiments.

MTC goal areas: (3) Natural Sciences
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Zach Bennett
Credits: 4

BIOL 1140Human Anatomy and Physiology 1

A study of tissues and organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, and integrated control mechanisms of physiology. For all students in health related fields. Helps to fulfill general education lab-science requirements.

MTC goal areas: (3) Natural Sciences
Course Pre-Requisite(s): Biol 1005 with a grade of C or better; OR Biol 1120
Faculty Liaison(s): Brian Bich
Credits: 4

CADE 1407AutoCAD I

This course covers basic engineering Computer Aided Design graphic image production through the use of computer hardware, software, and peripheral devices.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): Accuplacer NG Reading 250+ AND QAS 250+ (or AAF 236+)
Faculty Liaison(s): Rick Steel
Credits: 3

CARP 1418-Cabinetmaking I

This course covers the design, construction, and preparation for finishing of wooden cabinets. The student will become familiar with fundamental cabinetmaking techniques. The student will design and develop preliminary casework using appropriate construction procedures.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): Accuplacer NG Reading 250+ AND Arithmetic 270+ (or QAS 236-249 with Arithmetic 236-269)
Faculty Liaison(s): John Calcaterra
Credits: 1

CARP 1518Cabinetmaking II

This course covers the construction and finishing of wooden cabinets. The student will build skills in custom cabinetmaking techniques. The student will be completing the cabinet started in Cabinetmaking I.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): CARP 1418 or concurrent enrollment
Faculty Liaison(s): John Calcaterra
Credits: 2

CHEM 1110Aspects of Chemistry I

An introduction to the study of chemistry and its applications requiring a minimum of mathematics. The topics of this course include an introduction to stoichiometry, nomenclature, bonding, gas laws, and acids and bases. This course is intended primarily for those with no or a limited or outdated background in chemistry.

MTC goal area: (3) Natural Sciences
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.8 GPA and a C- or better in Algebra; OR Accuplacer NG QAS 250+ ; OR Next Generation AAF 236+
Faculty Liaison(s): Renee DeWitte
Credits: 3

CHEM 1210General Chemistry I

CHEM 1210 is the first semester of a two semester course sequence. It will provide preparation for students considering pre-professional and applied science careers as well as satisfying requirements for transfer curriculum. The basic fundamentals of chemistry will be covered, including modern atomic theory, the periodic table, stoichemetry, nomenclature, solutions, bonding, solution chemistry, the energy of reactions, properties of gases, and properties of solids and liquids.

MTC goal area: (3) Natural Sciences
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.8 GPA and a C- or better in Algebra and high school Chemistry; OR Accuplacer QAS 250+ ; OR Accuplacer AAF 236+
Faculty Liaison(s): Renee DeWitte
Credits: 5

COMM 1100Introduction to Communications

This course introduces students to the concepts, models, and theories of human communication and their application to interpersonal, small group, and public speaking situations.

MTC goal areas: (1) Communication
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Kelly Florence
Credits: 3

COMM 1110 Public Speaking

This course provides opportunities for students to become familiar with a variety of techniques to develop skills in research, organization, and presentation of informative and persuasive speeches. Students should expect to reduce speech apprehension and develop self-confidence in their ability to communicate in public.

MTC goal areas: (1) Communication
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Kelly Florence
Credits: 3

ENGL 1100Creative Writing

This course is designed to stimulate creativity in thought and perception and to enhance each student’s abilities to express his or her personal vision in written form. Students will be introduced to the basic language, concepts, and structures of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.

MTC goal areas: (1) Communication
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Jocelyn Pihlaja, Amy Jo Swing
Credits: 3

ENGL 1106Composition I

First semester college-level composition course focusing on writing expository prose using word processing as a tool for composing. Emphasis is on writing as a process, critical reading, developing a voice, and grammar review. Presupposes competency in Standard English.

MTC goal areas: (1) Communication
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Damon Kapke, Jocelyn Pihlaja, Lindsy Mason
Credits: 3

ENGL 1109-Composition II

Second semester college-level composition course focusing on academic writing using primary and secondary sources, including basic research using print and electronic sources. Emphasis is on writing as a process, critical analysis, summarizing, research, logical argumentation, and documentation. Presupposes competency in standard English.

MTC goal areas: (1) Communication
Course Pre-Requisite(s): ENGL 1106 with a grade of C or better
Faculty Liaison(s): Damon Kapke, Jocelyn Pihlaja, Lindsy Mason
Credits: 3

ENGL 1112Introduction to Literature

This foundational course introduces the study of literature as a mode of discourse for defining, exploring, and expressing human experience. The students will learn the skills of reading and writing about literature along with knowledge of its basic concepts. This survey course introduces the students to the major forms of literature: novels, short stories, poetry, plays and creative non-fiction.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities/Fine Arts
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Damon Kapke, Jocelyn Pihlaja, Lindsy Mason
Credits: 3

ENGL 2004- Fiction Writing

Creative writing workshop in which students develop style and voice through writing, reading, and responding to a variety of fiction styles, forms, and techniques.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities/Fine Arts
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+; OR ENGL 1100
Faculty Liaison(s): Jocelyn Pihlaja
Credits: 3

ENGL 2101British Literature: 12th to 17th Century

This course includes the study of major authors and works of British literature from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries. MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities and Fine Arts.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities/Fine Arts
Course Pre-Requisite(s): ENGL 1106 or concurrent enrollment
Faculty Liaison(s): Amy Jo Swing
Credits: 3

ENGL 2116American Immigrant Literature

Deeply rooted in the United States are conversations about who is allowed into the country and what it means to be an American. This course uses the literary writings of immigrants to develop nuanced understanding of the issues surrounding “the huddled masses yearning to breathe free” and resultant cultural diversity in America. Reading a cross-section of works from the diaspora, students apply critical thinking to the concepts of status, exclusion, assimilation, discrimination, intersectionality, and group differences. Class content focuses on the conflicts and motivations, traditions and values, successes and failures of those who have chosen to make the United States their home.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities and Fine Arts, and (7) Human Diversity
Course Pre-Requisite(s): ENGL 1106 or concurrent enrollment
Faculty Liaison(s): Lindsy Mason
Credits: 3

ENGL 2140World Literature

A survey of world literature. Includes selections of fiction, poetry, and essays from Africa, the Middle East, Australia, Oceania, Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, and North America.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities and Fine Arts, and (8) Global Perspective.
Course Pre-Requisite(s): ENGL 1106 or concurrent enrollment
Faculty Liaison(s): Lindsy Mason
Credits: 3

ENGL 2160Environmental Literature

This course explores environmentally-focused non-fiction, fiction, Poetry, and the relationship of people and policy with nature both in conflict and in harmony. Emphasis is on United States writers but will also include current worldwide environmental issues and events. Students will be encouraged to explore their own relationship to environment and nature throughout the course.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities and Fine Arts, and (10) People and the Environment
Course Pre-Requisite(s): ENGL 1106 or concurrent enrollment
Faculty Liaison(s): Damon Kapke
Credits: 3

ENGR 1100Introduction to Engineering

This course introduces students to the various engineering professions and their role in the world. Students are introduced to the basic principles and physical laws present in engineering study. Computational engineering tools are explored. Students are introduced to the design process through a team design project. The importance of effective communication will be emphasized.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): None
Faculty Liaison(s): Robert Zbikowski
Credits: 2

ENSC 1200Introduction to Environmental Science

The relationship of humans to their environment from local, regional, and global perspectives. Includes the study of natural ecosystems, the impact of human activity on natural resources and environmental quality, environmental ethics, and strategies to maintain a sustainable biosphere. Laboratory component includes experiences in the scientific method, basic ecological and environmental field techniques and assessment, and selected field trips to local agencies, research facilities, and businesses. Intended to fulfill general education requirement and serve as foundational course in environmental science/studies programs.

MTC goal areas: (3) Natural Sciences and (10) People and the Environment.
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Glenn Merrick
Credits: 4

HIST 1135World History 1500-Present

Surveys how the modern world that we live in today has come to be–world history from the rise of Europe to the present era (1500 to Present) and how the peoples of the world were linked through cultural, racial, religious contact and clash; migration and industrialization; and modern imperialism. Students will examine how technological, economic, social, religious, political, and cross-cultural factors combined to influence the expansion of the West and, in turn, the development of Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

MTC goal areas: (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Paul Richgruber
Credits: 3

HIST 1210 United States’ History to 1877

This course surveys the political, economic, and social history of the United States during the colonial and early national periods. It examines the plight of Native American peoples and the history of slavery in the United States, immigration patterns and the growth of the republic, as well as expansionism, sectionalism, Civil War, and the Reconstruction Era.

MTC goal areas: (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (7) Human Diversity
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Paul Richgruber
Credits: 3

HIST 1220 United States’ History since 1877

This course surveys the political, economic, and social history of the United States during the period of Reconstruction, the new South and the new West. It also covers segregation, industrialization, immigration patterns, the Progressive era, World War I, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, and Cold War America.

MTC goal areas: (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (7) Human Diversity
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Paul Richgruber
Credits: 3

HIST 1230 World History Since 1945

Considers historical issues and events that have shaped the world since the end of the Second World War–this course examines how the present world has come to be. Students will examine: the ideological, East-West divide during the Cold War and related conflicts; decolonization, revolution, and independence movements; economic and cultural globalization. The course will have a non-western focus with an emphasis on Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

MTC goal areas: (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Erik Riker-Coleman
Credits: 3

HIST 2110 Minnesota History

This course examines Minnesota’s history from the pre-historic and Native American periods through European discovery and American settlement to the present. Topics include: geographical aspects of Minnesota; Native American groups in Minnesota; European exploration and the fur trade; initial American settlement; statehood; the Dakota Conflict; the Civil War; the connection between Minnesotans and the natural environment; the Progressive Era and the 1920’s; the Depression and World War II; and the state’s economic, cultural, and political history since 1945.

MTC goal areas: (2) Critical Thinking, (5) History & the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (10) People & the Environment
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Erik Riker-Coleman
Credits: 3

HPER 1324Personal Wellness

A course designed to develop and actively pursue individual health and fitness goals in a noncompetitive atmosphere. Students will examine current health issues and the dimensions of wellness in the wellness lifestyle.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): None
Faculty Liaison(s): Jeremy Roseth
Credits: 3

HPER 1326Lifetime Fitness

A course designed to develop and actively pursue individual health and fitness goals in a noncompetitive atmosphere. Students will examine current health issues and the dimensions of wellness in the wellness lifestyle.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): None
Faculty Liaison(s): Jeremy Roseth
Credits: 2

MATH 1100College Algebra

The study of functions, theory of equations, inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and selected topics from advanced algebra.

MTC goal areas: (4) Mathematical/Logical Reasoning
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.8 GPA and a C- or better in Algebra II; OR Accuplacer AAF 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Sarah Bustrom, Randi Zimmerman
Credits: 4

MATH 1130Trigonometry

Description: Angles, circular functions, identities, right triangles, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, trigonometric equations, vectors, trigonometric form of complex numbers, and applications.

MTC goal areas: (4) Mathematical/Logical Reasoning
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.8 GPA and C- or better in Algebra II; OR Accuplacer AAF 263+ ; OR MATH 1100
Faculty Liaison(s): Sarah Bustrom, Randi Zimmerman
Credits: 3

MATH 1150Pre-Calculus

This course covers algebraic operations, functions, theory of equations, inequalities, absolute value graphing, logarithmic, exponentials, and analytic trigonometry. It is intended to be taken as a review course covering topics of both College Algebra and Trigonometry and will move quickly through the topics.

MTC goal areas: (4) Mathematical/Logical Reasoning
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.8 GPA and a C- or better in Algebra II; OR Accuplacer AAF 263+
Faculty Liaison(s): Sarah Bustrom, Zbigniew Wdowiak, Randi Zimmerman
Credits: 5

MATH 2204Calculus I

The first course in single variable calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, fundamentals of differentiation, differentiation of trigonometric functions, application of derivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, calculus of exponential and logarithmic functions, calculus of trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and hyperbolic functions.

MTC goal areas: (4) Mathematical/Logical Reasoning
Course Pre-Requisite(s): MATH1130 and MATH 1100 with a C or better; OR MATH 1150 with a C or better; OR 2.8 GPA and C- or better in high school Pre-Calculus with instructor consent; OR Accuplacer AAF 281+
Faculty Liaison(s): Sarah Bustrom, Zbigniew Wdowiak
Credits: 5

MATH 2210General Statistics

An introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics for business and pre-professional majors. The following topics will be covered: organizing data, averages and variations around the mean, probability and probability statistics, binomial, normal and sampling distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, testing variance, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

MTC goal areas: (4) Mathematical/Logical Reasoning
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.8 GPA and a C- or better in Algebra II; OR Accuplacer AAF 263+
Faculty Liaison(s): Randi Zimmerman
Credits: 3

MUSC 1130-Introduction to World Music

This course is designed to provide a broader understanding of music and its influence as a worldwide phenomenon through the study of selected musical traditions, and cultures of the world. This course will concentrate on the music of each region in a social, historical and cultural context, including typical instruments, performance traditions, and well-known musicians.

MTC goal areas: (6) Humanities and Fine Arts, and (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Jeffrey Madison
Credits: 3

NUNA 1420Nursing Assistant/ Home Health Aide

This course introduces concepts of basic human needs, health/illness continuum, and basic nursing skills. It is designed to prepare the student for entry level as a Nursing Assistant. In addition, the Home Health Aide component is designed to instruct students to apply basic nursing principles in caring for the client at home. This includes a mandatory 24 hour clinical component to be completed at a Long-Term Care facility. Upon successful completion of this course, the student is entitled to take the State Nursing Assistant/Home Health Aide Test Out.

Course Pre-Requisite(s): Student must be able to successfully pass the Health Occupations Physical and State Background Study
Faculty Liaison(s): Catherine Lassila
Credits: 4

PHYS 1201Introduction to Physics I

This course is the first in a sequence course in introductory physics. The course will focus on the study of the mechanics of particles and rigid bodies including temperature and thermal energy, kinetic theory of gases, laws of thermodynamics, kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, linear, angular momentum, work and energy, fluids, and sound. This course will provide preparation for students considering pre-professional and applied science careers as well as satisfying requirements for transfer curriculum. Not intended for engineering majors.

MTC goal areas: (3) Natural Sciences
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.8 GPA and a C- or better in Algebra II; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+ and AAF 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Robert Zbikowski
Credits: 5

PHYS 1202Introduction to Physics II

This is the second course in a sequence in introductory physics. This course focuses on the study of thermodynamics, electrostatics, electricity, magnetism, and optics. This course will satisfy requirements for the transfer curriculum in general education as well as providing preparation for students considering pre-professional and applied science careers.

MTC goal areas: (3) Natural Sciences
Course Pre-Requisite(s): PHYS 1201
Faculty Liaison(s): Robert Zbikowski
Credits: 5

PSCI 1110American Government and Politics

This course is an overview of political theory, party politics, constitutional foundations, and the structure, functions, branches, and operations of the American national (federal) government, including Congress, the Presidency, the judiciary, and other federal agencies.

MTC goal areas: (5) History & the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (9) Ethical and Civic Responsibility
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Paul Richgruber
Credits: 3

PSYC 1120General Psychology

A general education course which will familiarize the student with the basic principles of psychology, present a practical application of these principles, show how psychologists employ the scientific method, and equip the beginning student of psychology with a working vocabulary of psychological terminology and critical thinking skills. Areas to be covered include research, theoretical perspectives, the nervous system, learning, personality, memory, psychological disorders, and therapy.

MTC goal areas: (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (7) Human Diversity
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Susan Brashaw, Amanda Delich, Tara McCoy
Credits: 3

SOC 1111Introduction to Sociology

This course involves both an explanation of and active practice in using the sociological perspective to examine the world around us. It introduces Sociology as a discipline and sociological ways of understanding human social interaction and processes such as socialization, deviance, culture/society, and social change. This class teaches the use of Sociology in class via small-group exercises and the use of computers to explore questions about the social world.

MTC goal areas: (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (7) Human Diversity
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Theresa Leopold
Credits: 3

SOC 2120Social Problems

This course uses the topic of social problems to teach sociological concepts and processes coupled with civic responsibility. It examines a range of social problems and the diverse views of the common good that affect our perceptions of these problems. It encourages students to understand their own and others’ positions and to define social justice in light of those positions.

MTC goal areas: (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and (9) Ethical and Civic Responsibility
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Theresa Leopold
Credits: 3

SPAN 1010Beginning Spanish 1

Beginning Spanish is a grammatical approach to introductory vocabulary and verb tenses with emphasis on vocabulary building, listening comprehension, verbal response, and writing skills.

MTC goal areas: (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Michele Keane
Credits: 4

SPAN 1020Beginning Spanish II

A continuation of SPAN1010, a first course grammatical approach.

MTC goal areas: (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): SPAN 1010 or instructor consent
Faculty Liaison(s): Michele Keane
Credits: 4

SPAN 2010-Intermediate Spanish I

A grammatical approach to intermediate level reading, writing, listening and speaking. Readings deal with social and cultural topics of Spanish speaking countries with emphasis on vocabulary building.

MTC goal areas: (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Michele Keane
Credits: 4

SPAN 2020Intermediate Spanish II

Intensified study of the Spanish language through listening, speaking, and composition.

MTC goal areas: (8) Global Perspective
Course Pre-Requisite(s): 2.6 GPA; OR Accuplacer NG Reading 250+
Faculty Liaison(s): Michele Keane
Credits: 4