Lake Superior College is situated along north bank of Miller Creek, one of Duluth’s 16 designated city trout streams. With any built system comes impervious surface. From buildings to parking lots and grounds, our landscape planning incorporates innovative and natural structures aimed at reducing the amount of stormwater that reaches the stream directly.

Managing Stormwater

LSC’s landscape incorporates multiple rain gardens aimed at catching and filtering large amounts of water from spring melt and heavy rains. This water often contains large amounts of sediment or pollutants. Rain gardens are designed to be maintenance free after a couple of years when plant roots establish.

The main campus has installed three major rain garden systems. In 2006, the first rain garden near the west parking lot was a cooperative effort between the college and the South St. Louis County Soil and Water Conservation District. In 2007, the second garden was constructed with the Student Services Building addition. The primary purpose of this garden is to capture hillside runoff from the north side of the building through an under-building tunnel. The largest and most recent bio-swale system was completed in 2011 with the Health and Science Building.

Learn more about LSC’s Rain Gardens.

Keeping these structures free of trash and debris is also a major factor in keeping these structures functional. By encouraging on-campus groups to adopt parking lots on campus, the sense of pride and ownership of the campus is shared by everyone.

Lake Superior College operates as an Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) under our own Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP).  Find more information on MS4s and SWPPPs on the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s MS4 website.  View LSC’s most current SWPPP here.